Tag Archives: low vision

Web Accessibility Lessons from Blind and Low Vision Users — Medium

Approximately 10% of US citizens are blind or have some degree of vision loss.

At TransitScreen we are exploring ways to make our digital signage more accessible to blind and low vision (BLV) users. Our work on this project has just begun, but we already learned some important lessons that we wanted to share.

Good code = accessible

Too often accessibility is thought of as extra work to be done after a site is finished. But in reality well-written HTML is already accessible by default, so the majority of the “work” simply involves knowing how to use it correctly and complying with standards.

  • Use semantic markup appropriately by choosing the tag that best describes the content it contains.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Web Accessibility Lessons from Blind and Low Vision Users — Medium

accessibility videos for iOS and android

According to the National Health Interview Survey, there are over 20 million people with vision loss. If you need access to the Internet, it can be upsetting that as devices get smaller, so do the font sizes. The good news is that there are a lot of new and innovative ways to access the web.

… Check out these great features and innovative ways to navigate the websites that you want to access.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: accessibility videos for iOS and android

Accessibility – beyond the screen reader | Web design | Creative Bloq

There are 6.3 times as many people who have low vision than there are people who are blind.

People with low vision will usually either depend on browser features to resize text or zoom the page, magnification software, customized style sheets, built in high contrast themes, or a combination of the above. While screen readers may also be relied upon from time to time, the needs of low vision users have very little to do with the needs of blind users.

The Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) are extremely limited when it comes to catering to the needs of people with low vision on the Web. Except for a Success Criterion that ensures text is still fully readable at 200% of its original size, not much is planned to address their needs.

So how do we account for low vision users’ expectations in our design and in our code? How can we provide them with an experience that truly meets their needs and addresses their challenges? In this article, we’ll explore two basic concepts you can start implementing today: word wrapping and proximity.

curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Accessibility – beyond the screen reader | Web design | Creative Bloq