Tag Archives: reference

10 Free Web-Based Web Site Accessibility Evaluation Tools – Usability Geek

A simple Google Search for “Accessibility Tools” yields a number of lists and collections of tools. I could have very easily copied one or two such lists and voila, I have a new post. But, I wanted to add a personal touch to this post by writing about the tools I use in my daily job. I was surprised by the number of broken links in the lists I visited – most of them linking to obsolete Accessibility Tools such as Bobby – some with links to the old 1995 web site!

Before We Begin – A Warning

It is very important to keep in mind that to date, no web site evaluation tool has been developed that can completely replace a human being. This is because with present technology it is difficult to emulate human attributes such as common sense. In this regard, these tools should be used with caution, and the results that they produce should be interpreted in context with the web site you are evaluating. Moreover, since accessibility is a subset of usability, these tools should only be used to evaluate accessibility and not usability since, at best, they can only show you where your site is not accessible.

curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: 10 Free Web-Based Web Site Accessibility Evaluation Tools – Usability Geek

Free web accessibility tools round-up — bread crumbs — Medium

 

Free web accessibility tools round-up

If you’re like me, you’re one of the web developers on your team tasked with taking something seemingly-boring – like a mortgage calculator – and making it:

  1. Look and work fantastically. Something like Google Docs meets Facebook meets Spotify meets Snapchat… SnapDocBookify? Yeah, make that.
  2. Meet the demands of the client or business partners, even if they think your mortgage calculator needs a weather widget with room for the 7 day forecast on an Apple Watch.
  3. Fully accessible and WCAG AA compliant.
  4. Wait, what

Yep. Right now, maybe not surprisingly, #3 might seem the most daunting. Thankfully, it doesn’t have to be that bad. Let’s take a look at some of the free tools available that make our lives (and the lives of people with a disability) a bit easier!

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Free web accessibility tools round-up — bread crumbs — Medium

Authoring Tool Accessibility Guidelines (ATAG) 2.0 is a W3C Recommendation from Jeanne Spellman on 2015-09-24

ATAG 2.0 helps improve web accessibility by providing guidelines for designing web content authoring tools that are both more accessible to authors with disabilities (Part A) and designed to enable, support, and promote the production of more accessible web content by all authors (Part B). ATAG 2.0 helps authors meet WCAG 2.0.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Authoring Tool Accessibility Guidelines (ATAG) 2.0 is a W3C Recommendation from Jeanne Spellman on 2015-09-24 (w3c-wai-ig@w3.org from July to September 2015)

Web applications and ARIA FAQ – Accessibility | MDN

WAI-ARIA is the Accessible Rich Internet Applications specification from the Web Accessibility Initiative at the W3C. ARIA provides a means to make web applications and widgets more accessible to a diverse range of users, including those who use assistive technologies such as screen readers or magnifiers.

ARIA provides additional semantics to describe the role, state, and functionality of many familiar user interface controls, such as menus, sliders, trees, and dialogs. It also provides additional structural information, helping authors identify landmarks, regions, and grids on their pages. ARIA enables dynamic, JavaScript-driven applications and widgets to interoperate with a variety of desktop-based assistive technologies.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Web applications and ARIA FAQ – Accessibility | MDN

3 Ways to Improve the Accessibility of Your UI | Usability Matters

There’s a common misconception that an accessible digital product means sacrificing visual design, but there are many subtle changes you can make that will vastly improve the way people interact with and view your brand. Here are a few quick and easy tips you can implement today to help your users.

Colour Contrast

Colour contrast is one of the most commonly known accessibility issues, and yet it’s still a problem for many companies. To meet the minimum recommended accessibility (Level AA WCAG 2.0) large text (19px bold and above or 24px regular and above) has to meet a minimum contrast ratio of 3:1. …

Distinguishable Links

Along with meeting colour contrast guidelines, text links within your digital product shouldn’t rely on colour alone to distinguish them from surrounding text….

Pause or Stop Multimedia

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: 3 Ways to Improve the Accessibility of Your UI | Usability Matters

Top 10 Most Common Web Accessibility Mistakes – Cryptzone Insight

The importance of Web accessibility standards has been recognized around the world. Making sure your company is compliant with the latest standards can help you gain valuable market share and avoid the risk of costly litigation, settlements and loss of reputation and business.

In our experience helping companies ensure Web compliance, we run into 10 common accessibility mistakes. These are largely focused on the human factor of creating content instead of the framework for Web accessibility.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Top 10 Most Common Web Accessibility Mistakes – Cryptzone Insight

Getting started with ARIA – The Accessibility Project

ARIA (Assistive Rich Internet Applications), is a spec from the W3C and created to improve accessibility of applications by providing extra information to screen readers via HTML attributes. Out of the box, screen readers work with regular HTML, but adding ARIA can provide screen reader users with more context and greater interactivity with content.

ARIA has no effect on how elements are displayed or behave in browsers. It does not add new functionality and is meant to act only as an extra descriptive layer for screen readers.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Getting started with ARIA – The Accessibility Project