Tag Archives: review

Easy Checks – A First Review of Web Accessibility | (WAI) | W3C

Easy Checks – A First Review of Web Accessibility

This page helps you start to assess the accessibility of a web page. With these simple steps, you can get an idea whether or not accessibility is addressed in even the most basic way.

These checks cover just a few accessibility issues and are designed to be quick and easy, rather than definitive. A web page could seem to pass these checks, yet still have significant accessibility barriers. More robust assessment is needed to evaluate accessibility comprehensively.

This page provides checks for the following specific aspects of a web page. It also provides guidance on Next Steps and links to more evaluation resources.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Easy Checks – A First Review of Web Accessibility | Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI) | W3C

Accessibility Testing: Checkers & Development Tools Review

Tools of the Trade

In a different article, I outline the basics foundations of accessibility standards: “Understanding s508 & WCAG 2.0“. To further expand this, let’s look at various development tools to help author accessible content conformant to the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (“WCAG”) 2.0 standards.

Getting Started

For a primer or refresher on what the Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI) is review the W3 Org website and its associated entries on this subject at https://www.w3.org/WAI/.

Checkers and Tools

W3 Org offers a great list of available tools for developers to use when checking content for accessibility conformance at https://www.w3.org/WAI/ER/tools/. Various filters can be applied to this list, in order to narrow-down best options. For this article, I applied the following filters:

  • Guidelines > WCAG 2.0 – W3C Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0
  • Languages > English
  • License > Free and License > Open Source

From the filtered-list, I chose to explore the following tools/checkers:

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source.

 

ACMA review of the Captioning Quality Standard

The Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) has released the final report on the review it has been conducting of television captioning standards.

Remote control pointed at Smart TV

Under the Broadcasting Services Act 1992, the ACMA was required to conduct a review of the Captioning Quality Standard(link is external), which was introduced in 2013, and consider the differences between captioning for live, part-live and pre-recorded programs.

The final report(link is external) states that the ACMA received 11 submissions in response to its discussion paper, with nine of them supporting Option 1. The ACMA has decided to adopt Option 1, while also adding the following note to the standard.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Media Access

BraunAbility MXV: Accessibility done CNET style (CNET On Cars, Episode 87)

Something new for “accessibility news” … accessible vehicles.

2016 BraunAbillty MXV makes a Ford Explorer a cool accessible vehicle.

VIDEO: BraunAbility MXV: Accessibility done CNET style (CNET On Cars, Episode 87)

We’ve recently realized on this high tech show, we’ve never done a piece on wheelchair accessible vehicles. And that’s an oversight because they are an interesting slice of automotive engineering, and have long left the days of being kind of, After market, and they’re fit and finished. Not the least of which is something called the BraunAbility MXV a conversion built on a Ford platform, caught our eye. We thought it was time to get one in and check the tech.

Now the [UNKNOWN] ability NXV is based on a 16 Explorer, but you look at it and your eye says something isn’t right, is that really an Explorer yes. Proportions are different. Different and what your eyes being drawn to is the fact that it’s had its floor between the axle line dropped a large ten inches. Now, let’s see where that got them behind the other amazing piece of engineering. This is Akutagra, what used to be a hinged door on this stock Explore. Now, it becomes what they call a pop-out door. A completely customized motorized hinged and projector. That articulates the door out and then you’ve got a built in, belly stowed power ramp that comes out in sequence with it. [MUSIC] It looks like it’s just enough.

This is co-engineered with Ford. Cuz it’s major engineering. Look at this apparatus that had to be invented to create a pop out door out a hinge door. Similarly impressive what they did to this B pillar. Look how narrow it is now. This is a deceptively big deal. They had to curve this back to create reasonable usable wheelchair access with. I mean, look to the right side of that ramp pit but at the same time you can’t give up. The front seats in the MXV aren’t too far from the 007’s Aston Martin. But they don’t eject up they just come out. Unlock this, rotate this and you wheel them down the ramp. And when they are in the vehicle they retain full power adjustment and their airbag function. Thanks to an impressive wiring harness. The MXV is only available In front wheel drive. Once you drop the floor ten inches there’s now way to get a driveshaft to the back for all wheel drive.

Source: BraunAbility MXV: Accessibility done CNET style (CNET On Cars, Episode 87)

The Accessibility Of The iPhone 6s | TechCrunch

My aim with this article is to critique the iPhone 6s from the perspective of a person with disabilities, focusing on aspects of the phone which I feel influence its accessibility.

Using And Carrying The iPhone 6s

I’ve argued in the past that although conventional wisdom dictates that accessibility mostly refers to software, it applies just as aptly to hardware. The kinesthetic value of an iPhone — how it feels to hold and use it — is just as important as the accessibility of the software it runs. As someone with both vision and physical motor impairments, it’s equally important that my phone, as an object, be as comfortable in my hand as possible.

Bottom Line

I wrote at the outset of this piece about the “dilemma” of upgrading my iPhone every year. The logic against doing so is and will always be valid, but the truth is that updates like the iPhone 6s makes my decision a no-brainer.The reason I want to upgrade my phone so often isn’t so much because I’m a nerd or I need it for my job. It’s because my iPhone is the “remote control” of my life. My phone is an indispensable tool, and I want the best tool.The iPhone 6s fits the bill. It’s the best, most accessible remote control yet.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: The Accessibility Of The iPhone 6s | TechCrunch