Tag Archives: screen reader

Responses To The Screen Reader Strategy Survey | HeydonWorks

In September of last year, I decided I wanted to hear stories about how screen reader users access The Web. I suspected, as a sighted web user, I made a lot of incorrect assumptions. Accordingly, I composed seven questions to find out about strategies for reading and operation.Following are the raw, unedited responses (minus the occasional typo). I don’t want to editorialize, but let’s just say I learned a lot.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Responses To The Screen Reader Strategy Survey | HeydonWorks

Make your single page apps work with screen readers | Web design | Creative Bloq

Single-page apps pose a significant accessibility challenge when it comes to communicating view changes. Without a page refresh, screen readers do not pick up these important UI changes, leaving vision-impaired users confused and unaware.

curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Make your single page apps work with screen readers | Web design | Creative Bloq

HTML For Screen Readers – Labelling Elements

To screen readers, a lot of the visual information that is presented on a webpage is lost. Because of this, we need to specifically provide information to them that may be obvious to a person looking at the page.

One common way people define information specifically for screen readers is to wrap the descriptive text in an element with a particular class, such as .screen-reader-text, and hide the element using a method that keeps it visible to screen readers.

Although this does work, we can use ARIA attributes that are specifically for this purpose.

curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: HTML For Screen Readers – Labelling Elements | bitsofcode

Screen Readers on Touchscreen Devices

In most browsers, hover over the video to display the controls if they’re not already visible.(You can try it yourself. Turn on your device’s screen reader in the Accessibility section. For iPhones, go to Settings > General > Accessibility > VoiceOver. For Android, go to Settings > Accessibility.  Give it a try for a few hours. Good luck. It takes a while to get the hang of it, but it will come.)

Browsing on touchscreen devices involves a range of gestures, many of which offer far more functionality than the tap and swipe gestures of the sighted world. To give you a better idea, here is a sample of some of the most common gestures for VoiceOver:

Drag one finger over the screen to explore the interface and hear the screen reader speak what’s under your finger.
Flick two fingers down the screen to hear it read the page from the top down.
Single tap brings a button or link in focus (so you know what it is); double tap activates the control.
3-finger horizontal flick is the equivalent of a regular swipe.
3-finger vertical flick scrolls the screen up or down.

As you can see, the vocabulary of gestures that users with low vision have to learn is quite wide. We know that gestures have low discoverability and learnability, yet for power users they do represent the only way to navigate efficiently through a system largely based on sequential access.

….

Excellent video on how VoiceOver gestures work can be viewed from source link below.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Screen Readers on Touchscreen Devices

How Windows Screen Readers Work on the Web – SSB BART Group

If you try to use a Windows screen reader on the web for the first time, you might find the experience to be daunting and confusing. This is because Windows screen readers introduce new access paradigms which do not always match what is displayed visually. Windows screen readers offer several modes to allow a user to review and interact with web content. Successfully using a screen reader on the web requires the user to be able to determine which mode is currently active, the operation paradigm for each mode, and how to switch modes as required. Developers also need to be cognizant of the screen reader modes used for accessing different types of content and the effect that their code will have on the user experience if a particular mode is used.

Curated by (Lifekludger)

Read full article at Source: How Windows Screen Readers Work on the Web – SSB BART Group

Accessibility – beyond the screen reader | Web design | Creative Bloq

There are 6.3 times as many people who have low vision than there are people who are blind.

People with low vision will usually either depend on browser features to resize text or zoom the page, magnification software, customized style sheets, built in high contrast themes, or a combination of the above. While screen readers may also be relied upon from time to time, the needs of low vision users have very little to do with the needs of blind users.

The Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) are extremely limited when it comes to catering to the needs of people with low vision on the Web. Except for a Success Criterion that ensures text is still fully readable at 200% of its original size, not much is planned to address their needs.

So how do we account for low vision users’ expectations in our design and in our code? How can we provide them with an experience that truly meets their needs and addresses their challenges? In this article, we’ll explore two basic concepts you can start implementing today: word wrapping and proximity.

curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Accessibility – beyond the screen reader | Web design | Creative Bloq

WebAIM: Screen Reader User Survey #6 Results

In July 2015, WebAIM conducted a survey of preferences of screen reader users. We received 2515 valid responses to this survey, our highest thus far.

A few disclaimers and notices:

Totals may not equal 100% due to rounding.
Total responses (n) for each question may not equal 2515 due to respondents not answering that particular question.
The sample was not controlled and may not represent all screen reader users.

We hope to conduct additional surveys of this nature again in the future. ….

Source: WebAIM: Screen Reader User Survey #6 Results