Tag Archives: text

How to Get Your iPhone to Read On-Screen Text Aloud to You

Being able to hear written text on your phone read aloud to you can serve multiple purposes. If you have any type of impaired vision, it can certainly help in that regard. It’s also useful in settings where you don’t have the time nor capability to stare at your phone and read large blocks of text. Perhaps you want to treat whatever your reading as an audiobook of sorts.Whatever the case may be, your iPhone is perfectly capable of reading nearly any text you select back to you. All you first need to do is enable this feature in Settings.

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Curated by (Lifekludger)
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Designing Perfect Text Field: Clarity, Accessibility and User Effort

Designing Perfect Text Field: Clarity, Accessibility and User Effort04 AUGUST 2016 on UX, Design, UI

For any app or web application, nothing will ever happen without some initial and ongoing input from the user. It is, therefore, critical that product designers, developer and product managers understand the best ways to allow them to do so.

In this article we’ll examine key factors that improve data input by focusing on text fields. Keep in mind that these are general guideline and there are exceptions to every rule.

A text field is a basic text control that enables the user to type a small amount of text. No matter what app you use, you’re bound to run across some little text field requiring your personal information. Even typing a question into Google is considered filling out a form which has only one text field.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
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“Learn More” Links: You Can Do Better

Summary: The phrase ‘Learn More’ is increasingly used as a crutch for link labels. But the text has poor information scent and is bad for accessibility. With a little effort, transform this filler copy into descriptive labels that help users confidently predict what the next page will be.

Some trends are subtler than others. Much like low-contrast text, the use of Learn More as a standalone link label has been quietly trending. The web now has an abundance of links with this generic label, largely tacked on to information of secondary or tertiary importance. (A Google search finds 1.4 billion instances of this term, though some admittedly might be from proper use of the term in general content.) Typically, these links are placed after a short paragraph that briefly introduces a topic, feature, or service, so that the Learn More points the visitor to the detail page. Usually, these links are not the main calls to action on the page, which partly explains why this copywriting detail doesn’t get as much attention or A/B testing as other calls to action.

Most of you have surely seen this pattern. Below is an example of what we’re talking about:

Curated by (Lifekludger)
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Why Your Links Should Never Say “Click Here” – Smashing Magazine

Have you ever wanted your users to click a link but didn’t know how to get them to act? When some designers run into this problem, they’re tempted to use the words “Click here” on their links.

Before giving in to the temptation, you should know how using these words on a link can affect how users experience your interface. Not to mention that having proper link titles is a major accessibility requirement since the term ‘click’ is irrelevant to many assistive technologies and isn’t descriptive enough for screen readers.

Curated by Lifekludger, view complete article at Source: Why Your Links Should Never Say “Click Here” – Smashing Magazine

Text justification and accessibility | Access iQ

Text justification is the spacing of text across a page or column where both left and right margins are aligned to create a clean and block look. It is often favoured by graphic designers or people who create brochures or other display advertising.From an accessibility perspective, we need to be aware of how text justification may affect the readability of a document for some people.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Text justification and accessibility | Access iQ