Tag Archives: tips

Learn How to Use ChromeVox Next Screen Reader [Videos]

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www­.lireo­.com – When Chrome 56 was released in January 2017, people were excited with the new features, including:

 

One of the new features I think many people may have overlooked in Chrome 56 was the new ChromeVox…

Key Takeaways from the Videos

  • Turn on (and off) ChromeVox Next by holding down the CTRL + ALT keys and pressing the Z key
  • The search key on the Chromebook keyboard is the ChromeVox modifier key (often called ChromeVox in the commands). It’s used in combination with other keys to help you navigate pages.
  • In Learn Mode (press ChromeVox + O + K), you can hear the name of each key you press (or if you’re pressing multiple keys for a command, you’ll hear the command name)
  • Close a browser tab using CTRL + W
  • Temporarily silence speech by pressing CTRL
  • You can navigate a page linearly, using jump commands, or with ChromeVox menus
  • Access the new ChromeVox menus feature using ChromeVox + . (period)
  • If you enable Sticky Mode (double-tap the search key quickly), you don’t have to use the search key for your commands (turn Sticky Mode off by double-tapping the search key quickly)

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Learn How to Use ChromeVox Next Screen Reader [Videos]

108 million web users are color blind. Tips for designing keeping them in mind

Design, keeping everyone in mind

As designers, you pick up the best colors for the canvas and the most engaging content for your users, but often miss out on the color blind ones. Repeating the ever-repeated stats — 8% of the males and 0.5% of the females are color blind. Now that is a HUUUGE number if your user base is big. Ignoring these 8% and 0.5% of the society is no way acceptable. Here are few tip and tricks to help you design aligned with their needs as well-

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: 108 million web users are color blind. Tips for designing keeping them in mind

Top tips for accessibility

Heidi Laidler, Media Access Australia’s User Experience Designer, gave a recent talk about how to test for accessibility at a ‘Hack 4 Good’ event attended by web professionals from around the country. Discover the top tips for accessibility from a user experience point of view, in this captivating podcast article.

Listen to Heidi’s complete address where she delves into the details of how to effectively test for accessibility and incorporate inclusive design principles into your web and digital communications.

Read the transcript of Heidi Laidler’s talk on top tips for accessibility

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Top tips for accessibility – Media Access Australia

Writing HTML with accessibility in mind

Writing HTML with accessibility in mind

An introduction to web accessibility. Tips on how to improve your markup and provide users with more and betters ways to navigate and interact with your site. If you don’t want to read the preface, jump right to the tips.

Personal development and change in perspective When I made my first website my highest priority was to get content online. I didn’t care much about usability, accessibility, performance, UX or browser compatibility. Why would I? …

If you don’t want to read the preface, jump right to the tips.

Personal development and change in perspective

When I made my first website my highest priority was to get content online. I didn’t care much about usability, accessibility, performance, UX or browser compatibility. Why would I? I made a robust table based layout and I offered a 800×600 and a 1024×768 version of my site. On top of that, I informed users that the website was optimized for Internet Explorer 5.

This was of course before I started to work professionally as a web designer and my perspective in what was important changed.

Years later, instead of dictating the requirements for my websites, I started to optimize them for all major browsers.

Beginning with Ethan Marcotte’s game changing article I started caring about devices as well.

Making websites for all kinds or browsers and devices is great, but pretty much useless if the websites are too slow. So I learned everything about critical CSS, speed indices, font loading, CDNs and so on.

Getting started with accessibility (a11y)


But accessibility isn’t just yet another item on our to-do list to cross off before we launch our website. Accessibility is the foundation of what we do as web designers and web developers and it’s our obligation to treat it as such.

I spent the last few months reading, listening and talking about web accessibility. It took me some time to get my head around a few things and I’m still at the beginning, but the more I learn the more I’m surprised how much I can do right now without having to learn anything completely new.

In this series of articles, I want to share some of my newly acquired knowledge with you. You shouldn’t treat the tips I’m going to give you as a check list but as a starting point. Incorporating these techniques into your workflow will get you started with accessibility and hopefully motivate you to learn and care more about your users.


Without further ado, here are my accessibility tips:

Source: Writing HTML with accessibility in mind – Medium

3 steps to fulfill 80% standards with 20% effort


3 steps to fulfill 80% standards with 20% effort

Make your website usable with keyboard only: make sure that focus outline is visible all the time and user can determine which element is currently focusedno extra/unnecessary TAB stopsno tabstop traps (when you cannot get out of an element with the keyboard)

Implement smart focus management:
set focus on appropriate elements after user actions (e.g., when a user navigates to a page with a login form – set the focus on the login text field; in 90% of the cases the next user action will be entering the login)restore focus to appropriate elements after user actions (e.g., when a user closes a menu, focus should be restored to the element that was focused on before opening the menu)make tab order user-friendly (remove non-actionable and non-informative tab stops)

Make your website usable with screen reader:

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Web Accessibility Hacker Way

Simple Ways to Make Your WordPress Site Accessible

Web site accessibility has been a lingering issue on the Internet for quite some time. However, with several laws in the US pushing website accessibility as a primary feature in public and private web entities, it has affected the Internet on a wider scale.

Accessibility has been proven to be beneficial to websites, public or businesses alike. Certain sites were slapped with legal complications, like this court case of a visually impaired handicap versus a luggage company. This also creates a positive PR for your website; social responsibility is a desirable trait that often gets a nod from the online community.

On the other hand, it positively affects your website’s search engine rankings as well. Website accessibility is good for SEO, as making your website accessible requires you to input text that can be read by screen readers and web crawlers alike.

It improves usability for the handicapped and non-handicapped. It also broadens your market reach. In the UK alone, since 2015, the number of disabled adults who had used the internet in the last 3 months has increased by 6.8% to 8.6 million in 2016. Imagine reaching out to 8.6 million more visitors and prospective buyers!

The disabled may be a minor group, but there’s strength in their numbers. The following simple tweaks will help your website gain more followers as you make your site accessible to all:

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Simple Ways to Make Your WordPress Site Accessible

Part 2: How to Conduct a Basic Accessibility Audit on Your Site : Adobe Team

Continued from Part 1.

Part 2: How to Conduct a Basic Accessibility Audit on Your Site

In case you missed it, catch up on Part 1 of How to Conduct a Basic Accessibility Audit on Your Site.

In this post, we are going to learn how to do keyboard, screen reader and automated code testing.

Testing with a keyboardUnderstanding how people might be using your site with assistive technology is a great way to gain empathy and insight into the impacts of poor accessibility.

Remember that some people may not be able (or not want to!) use a mouse, due to motor impairments or personal preferences. Navigating by keyboard takes some practice. The basics are:The tab key moves forward through interactive elements on the page and shift tab moves backwards.Using the enter key should select a link or button.The arrow keys should navigate within dropdowns.

The space bar works with form controls for example checking or unchecking a checkbox.Gov.uk has a skip to main content link and a clear visual focus state when using a keyboard.

To run a keyboard test on your site:Go to your site.

Unplug your mouse – you are not allowed to use it. No cheating!

Hit the tab key to get started.

Do interactive elements have the same functionality as they do when using a mouse?

Is the order of the focus states logical?

As you get the hang of keyboard navigation, you will learn how important the order of focus states is, as well as discovering interactive elements which don’t function well. A common problem is a ‘keyboard trap’ – where you cannot move away from an interactive element using the keyboard alone.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Part 2: How to Conduct a Basic Accessibility Audit on Your Site : Adobe Dreamweaver Team Blog

Part 1: How to Conduct a Basic Accessibility Audit on Your Site : Adobe Team

Part 1: Visual Accessibility and Manual Code Inspection

Accessibility is really important: Accessibility benefits everyone. By paying attention to accessibility you will improve the UX of your site for all of your users.Making sure your site is accessible expands your customer base. People with a range of disabilities make up a significant portion of the buying power.It’s the right thing to do – designing and developing with an eye to inclusivity means that we value and respect all users and people equally.

There are legal imperatives. More and more legislation is coming into play that mandates accessibility, particularly in the transportation and technology sectors.

It can seem overwhelming, but there are a few simple things you can do to evaluate your site’s accessibility. Many different types of people need to use the web. Not everyone is using technology in the same way. It is crucial to design for a range of abilities and assistive technologies, to make sure that people do not experience barriers to using your site.Web accessibility is a deep and important topic,  and there are people and companies who specialise in it. The WCAG 2.0 guidelines are considered the industry standard in accessibility, but these can feel overwhelming! Each guideline has three levels of success criteria, A, AA and AAA. The level of compliance that is legally required varies depending on where you are based and the sector.

As a rule of thumb for getting started, aim for level AA. For this post, let’s look at some of the easy ways to get started with some basic accessibility auditing on the sites you design and develop.

Part 2 continues here

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Part 1: How to Conduct a Basic Accessibility Audit on Your Site : Adobe Dreamweaver Team Blog

Blind Arduino Blog: Arduino Setup and Accessibility Tips for Windows

In a world of talking iPhones, sexy accessibility announcements, and high-quality open-source screen readers, the naive sighted person could be forgiven for assuming that we have finally reached the point where a blind person could simply download and use the same exact software tools as everyone else for any given problem.

Blind people know that it is rarely that simple. There are a wide variety of issues that still stand as barriers to equal access in all sorts of situations, and Arduino development on Windows is no exception.

While it is definitely possible to set up an accessible development environment for Arduino on Windows, many of the steps may not be immediately obvious, especially to the beginner.

This post is intended to streamline the Arduino setup process, flagging accessibility work-arounds, and providing a step-by-step guide to setting up the tools you’ll need for Arduino development as a blind maker.

If you are just getting started and don’t know anything about Windows, software development, accessibility, or Arduino, this blog is probably not the best place to start. This article assumes you’re already comfortable with Windows and your screen reader, and that you know what Arduino is and have some motivation to make things with it.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Blind Arduino Blog: Arduino Setup and Accessibility Tips for Windows