Tag Archives: tool

PAVE 2.0: A New Generation of the Web Tool for PDF Accessibility 

The ICT-Accessibility Lab of the ZHAW, in collaboration with the Swiss Blind and Visually Impaired Association (SBV), has developed a web tool called PAVE which quickly and easily makes existing PDF documents accessible.

This is critical for allowing existing screen-reading programs to read the correct content. With PAVE 2.0, the existing web tool has been fundamentally revised and extended with a new paragraph detection feature.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: PAVE 2.0: A New Generation of the Web Tool for PDF Accessibility Global Alliance on Accessible Technologies and Environments

Evaluating Cognitive Web Accessibility with WAVE

WAVE Web Accessibility Tool

Introduction

WAVE is a web accessibility tool that can greatly assist in the evaluation of web content. Rather than providing a complex technical report, WAVE shows the original web page with embedded icons and indicators that reveal the accessibility of that page. …

WAVE, like any other automated tool, cannot tell you if your page is accessible, but it can help in human evaluation of web accessibility. …

The following checklist outlines things you can do to evaluate and improve cognitive web accessibility. This checklist is broken into general areas of cognitive accessibility. Many of the items listed are things that you must check for yourself on the page.

Cognitive Web Accessibility Checklist

Consistency

Transformability

Multi-modality

Focus and Structure

Readability and Language

Orientation and Error Prevention/Recovery

Assistive Technology Compatibility

Users with cognitive or learning disabilities often use screen readers or other assistive technologies to access content through various senses or to modify content to be best perceivable to them. Users with other physical or sensory disabilities also have a higher prevalence of cognitive or learning disabilities. The vast majority of WAVE icons indicate assistive technology errors, alerts, or features. Below are particular items to be aware of when evaluating assistive technology support for users with cognitive disabilities.

 

 

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Evaluating Cognitive Web Accessibility with WAVE

Accessibility Checker Goes Open Source

It’s Global Accessibility Awareness Day today! To celebrate it in a big way, we would like to announce that as of today, Accessibility Checker for CKEditor will be available also under an Open Source GPL license. If you care about accessibility, want to learn more about how important it is, and get to know our new product, read on!

The StoryAccessibility support has always been a priority issue at CKSource. CKEditor complies with most important industry standards, recommendations and checklists plus it includes a number of features that make it easy to use with assistive technologies.Last year we decided to give our dedication to web accessibility a big boost and entered the market with Accessibility Checker – an innovative tool that enables you to check your content for accessibility issues and fix them before you go live.​

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Accessibility Checker Goes Open Source | CKSource.com

Evaluating Cognitive Web Accessibility with WAVE

WAVE is a web accessibility tool that can greatly assist in the evaluation of web content. Rather than providing a complex technical report, WAVE shows the original web page with embedded icons and indicators that reveal the accessibility of that page. Before proceeding, be sure to read the Help page for an overview of using WAVE and details on specific things you may encounter.

The following checklist outlines things you can do to evaluate and improve cognitive web accessibility. This checklist is broken into general areas of cognitive accessibility. Many of the items listed are things that you must check for yourself on the page. Some checkpoints may be difficult to measure or may not have a clear answer (for example, how do you tell if language is “simple”?). This checklist, however, should help you determine the general level of cognitive accessibility and can help you identify areas where improvements can be made. WAVE can facilitate evaluation of many of the checkpoints. WAVE icons that appear adjacent to a checkpoint indicate specific WAVE rules that can be of assistance to you. You can click on the icons to view details about that icon, why it might appear in your content, and what you can do to improve accessibility. If you see these icons in a WAVE report, pay particular attention to them because they likely indicate an aspect of the page that can affect cognitive accessibility.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Evaluating Cognitive Web Accessibility with WAVE

How to Measure Color Contrast, for Web Accessibility …

The essence of accessible color contrast is simple. Given a foreground color and a background color, the contrast between those two must be distinguishable in a wide variety of environments, by individuals with different color perception abilities. Using the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines – WCAG — version 2.0, these contrasts are measured using an algorithm that compares the relative luminosity of the two colors and returns a ratio, which is to exceed WCAG’s recommended minimum.But the reality of color contrast is more complicated. There are a lot of assumptions to work out before you can be confident that visually impaired shoppers can use your ecommerce site.

What Are ‘Foreground’ and ‘Background’ Colors?

 

…This clearly applies when text needs to be distinguished from the background color. White text on a white background may as well be absent entirely. But it also applies to neighboring text, such as a link within a paragraph. If that link looks the same as the text surrounding it, there will be no way of identifying visually which text is linked.

If your links are underlined, this becomes a non-issue.

What Two Colors Are We Comparing?

The simple case of text in a single color and a background in another is easy. When assessing contrast, automated tools will reliably identify the two different colors.

But that is not true with other common cases:

  • Text with text-shadow;
  • Background gradients;
  • Image backgrounds;
  • Transparency in one or more colors.

Adding a thin black outline with a minimum width of one pixel is a WCAG recommendation to maintain a contrast ratio between the letter and its background. While this doesn’t directly correlate to text shadow, it’s reasonable to extrapolate that adding a text shadow to darken the boundary of your text allows you to use it for measuring contrast, rather than depending on the background color.

 

Challenges with Transparency…

 

What Are the Contrast Requirements?…

 

Resources for Color Contrast Testing…

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: How to Measure Color Contrast, for Web Accessibility | Practical Ecommerce

Contrast Ratio: Easily calculate color contrast ratios. Passing WCAG was never this easy!

The simplest, easiest tool for quickly finding good contrast:

 

Capture

As you type, the contrast ratio indicated will update. Hover over the circle to get more detailed information. When semi-transparent colors are involved as backgrounds, the contrast ratio will have an error margin, to account for the different colors they may be over.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Contrast Ratio: Easily calculate color contrast ratios. Passing WCAG was never this easy!

Accessibility Developer Tools – Chrome Web Extension

Accessibility audit and element properties.

This extension will add an Accessibility audit, and an Accessibility sidebar pane in the Elements tab, to your Chrome Developer Tools. To use the audit: go to the Audits tab, select the Accessibility audit, and click Run.

\The audit results will appear as a list of rules which are violated by the page (if any), with one or more elements on the page shown as a result for each rule. To use the sidebar pane: inspect an element in the Elements tab, then expand the …

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Accessibility Developer Tools – Chrome Web Store

PDF Accessibility Checker (PAC 2)

PAC 2 tests PDF files quickly with respect to accessibility. PAC 2 is the support of experts and stakeholders in the evaluation tests.

The completely newly developed version of PAC 2 examines the PDF / UA-conformity of PDFs. The PDF review has been further improved, so that PAC 2 You can even better assist you in creating accessible documents.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at PDF Accessibility Checker (PAC 2)

Making Accessibility Simpler, With Ally.js – Smashing Magazine

A long read but worth it.

One of the first things you’ll learn when looking at ARIA is that supporting keyboard navigation is fundamental. And the first step to understanding keyboard navigation is to understand what focus is. And this is where I tripped, because nobody knew (in detail) which elements could receive focus and which could not.

Having had a bit of experience testing browser compatibility (“CSS3 Transitions: Thank God We Have A Specification!”), I decided I would spend some time investigating. An ebook covering my findings is in the works and will be ready to make you lose focus in early 2016. But more importantly, the JavaScript variant of that book is available today:ally.js is a JavaScript library to help modern web applications with accessibility concerns by making accessibility simpler.

Source: Making Accessibility Simpler, With Ally.js – Smashing Magazine

Diagnostic.css – Super quick web accessibility testing – Karl Groves

In my quest to make accessibility accessible, I’ve created a super-easy-to-use tool that people can use to do accessibility testing. If you can view the page in the browser, you can use this tool. Diagnostic.css is a CSS (Cascading Stylesheets) file which, when applied to a web page, will highlight accessibility errors in the page.

curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Diagnostic.css – Super quick web accessibility testing – Karl Groves