Tag Archives: usability

Defining and Measuring Usability and UX. The Big Difference Between Usability and UX

Everyone knows that user-friendly websites and apps are vital for the overall success of a business. We know that design quality indicates credibility and trust and that those things drive results.

We know this.

So how do you know that your site or app is easy to use? What steps do you take to know for sure that your design is driving those results?

This guide will define what usability and UX are (as these terms are often confused) and this guide will also show you how usability and UX can be measured.

Ready? Let’s get started.

Usability is Not UX

We hear the terms often: usability, UX but let’s admit it – although we know they are both important in the design world, we often confuse them.

Usability is about task-based interactions such as navigating a site, filling out a form, checking out at an online store, etc. It’s the ability to do something intuitively and easily.

UX is about how a person feels when they interact with your site or app. Are they encouraged to sign up to your newsletter? Are they moved by the design in the front page? Is the copy engaging or dull?

Let’s dive into some of the details.

What Exactly is Usability?

Designers, developers, and usability experts have racked their brains trying to define usability. The truth is, there is not a universal definition. There are many books and resources on the topic and not one of them is the same.

Jakob Nielsen describe usability with these five qualities or as he calls them, “Usability Goals.”

  1. Usefulness. Although it may seem obvious, you should always be curious and ask: Is this feature useful? Is it redundant? Will it help the user accomplish a task?
  2. Learnability. When a new user comes to your website or app, you want them to easily learn how to get around. What are you doing to make this happen?
  3. Memorability: When users return to the design after a period of not using it, will they remember it?
  4. Errors: What happens when uses make an error? How many errors do users make, and do they eventually find a solution?
  5. Satisfaction. How pleasant is it to use the design? Are users sharing the website? Have you delighted them or did the whole experience cause them frustration?

How Do You Measure Usability?

Source: Defining and Measuring Usability and UX. The Big Difference Between Usability and UX

15 Website Accessibility Tips That Increase Everyone’s Engagement | UX Magazine

Making your website compliant with WCAG and ADA benefits everyone, not just those with disabilities.Article No :1543 | December 17, 2015 | by Rashaud Brooks

 

For over a decade, the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) has been advocating for standardized website development and content to increase the accessibility of the Internet for those with disabilities.

But consent decrees and/or settlement agreements for inaccessible websites have hit Target, Amazon.com, PeaPod, Netflix, H&R Block, Hilton International and many other corporations over the past few years.

Ultimately, compliance with the DOJ and the American Disabilities Act (ADA) is not just about better serving the individuals with vision or hearing issues—it’s about providing a better web user experience for everyone.

The importance of an inclusive user experience

To help navigate the web, tech innovators have done a great job providing assistive devices like screen reader software (seen in the video below), voice interactive software, Braille output devices, or closed captioning.

But even with these technology tools, an estimated 18% of the United States population with disabilities still have website access issues. This is a big deal, not because of the maximum penalty the DOJ imposes for a violation is $75,000 (subsequent violations are $150,000), or because settlements are in the millions. This is a big deal because businesses can’t afford to ignore almost 20% of their target audience, especially when the U.S. Department of Labor estimates this population controls more than $200 billion of discretionary spending power.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: 15 Website Accessibility Tips That Increase Everyone’s Engagement | UX Magazine

Stop Counting Clicks

The 3-click-rule is the Freddy Kreuger of web design advice. You think it’s finally dead and then it comes back and starts slashing up sensible debate about usable design. I’m hoping to convince you to stop talking about the 3-click rule.

In 2003, Joshua Porter of User Interface Engineering wrote an article that should have killed the 3-click rule for good. He found that the number of clicks affects neither task completion nor user satisfaction. Porter says in his article:

“…the Three-Click Rule does not focus on the real problem. The number of clicks isn’t what is important to users, but whether or not they’re successful at finding what they’re seeking.”

in order to keep some tasks simple for your users, they may have to click more often.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Stop Counting Clicks

Katrina the Tester: Accessibility & Usability Testing Pathway

Accessibility & Usability Testing Pathway

This pathway is a tool to help guide your self development in accessibility and usability testing. It includes a variety of steps that you may approach linearly or by hopping about to those that interest you most.

Each step includes:

links to a few resources as a starting point, but you are likely to need to do your own additional research as you explore each topic.

a suggested exercise or two, which focus on reflection, practical application and discussion, as a tool to connect the resources with your reality.

curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Katrina the Tester: Accessibility & Usability Testing Pathway

My Approach to Mobile Accessibility Testing – Ministry of Testing

When I get asked by team members about mobile accessibility, I am often asked how difficult it is compared to desktop accessibility testing. Often the questions indicate how many assume that mobile accessibility is a completely different beast to traditional functional and accessibility software testing. This has prompted me to write this …

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: My Approach to Mobile Accessibility Testing – Ministry of Testing