Tag Archives: ux

Start Making Sense — Medium

This is the text of a quick talk I gave at Generate Conference in London on 17th September 2015. You can download the slides from Slideshare. You can find out more on SensoryUX.com.

“I’m here to talk about sensory design and what I do: which is to try and make information meaningful.

Meaningful to people with physical or cognitive impairments.

I can take visual information and convert it to tactile or convert complex textual information to simple graphics or audio.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Start Making Sense — Medium

Why Your Links Need a Hover Effect – UX Movement

Links contain text, but they should never look like text. When users read a web page, they need to be able to distinguish what’s clickable. If your links don’t have enough contrast, users could miss them.Color is Not Enough for the Colorblind

Most sites make their links a different color from their text. But that’s not enough contrast for colorblind users. The difference in color is hard for them to see. Colorblind users have to rely on their cursor change (arrow to hand) as feedback.

A hover effect can give them a clear signal to see what’s clickable. When users move their cursor over a link, they’ll notice a change in color or shape that tells them to click. This prevents them from missing links.

curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Why Your Links Need a Hover Effect – UX Movement

Stop Counting Clicks

The 3-click-rule is the Freddy Kreuger of web design advice. You think it’s finally dead and then it comes back and starts slashing up sensible debate about usable design. I’m hoping to convince you to stop talking about the 3-click rule.

In 2003, Joshua Porter of User Interface Engineering wrote an article that should have killed the 3-click rule for good. He found that the number of clicks affects neither task completion nor user satisfaction. Porter says in his article:

“…the Three-Click Rule does not focus on the real problem. The number of clicks isn’t what is important to users, but whether or not they’re successful at finding what they’re seeking.”

in order to keep some tasks simple for your users, they may have to click more often.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Stop Counting Clicks

How to expand your audience with Game Accessibility

We make games for others to enjoy. We want to reach the largest amounts of players possible within our target group. There are many decisions we can take in our design process to improve the feel of our game. We can invest time on the core mechanics, the aesthetics, and the sound design. All that is of great importance.

We want our games to keep the players in a mental state of flow as much as possible. Our games should try their best to keep the player immersed in its world. In other words, our role as designers is to provide a good user experience. That is the field of UX design. It is all about making our creations usable, enjoyable and accessible.

Those 3 components of UX design are deeply linked to one another. Your game will hardly be pleasant if its UI is hard to navigate, or if its rules are unclear or ever-changing. That both relates to usability and accessibility. As you guessed, we are going to focus on accessibility here, one of the 3 pillars of user experience design. Game accessibility is an emerging field of study that focuses on making games more accessible to all gamers. Disabled ones in particular.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: How to expand your audience with Game Accessibility

A Guide to Color, UX, and Conversion Rates

Color is one of the most powerful tools in the designer’s toolkit. You can use color to impact users’ emotions, draw their attention, and put them in the right frame of mind to make a purchase. It’s also one of the main factors in customers’ perception of a brand. With an infinite number of possible color combinations out there, it can be hard to decide what colors will make the biggest impact on your site or app. It would be impossible to test everything, but we’ve picked up a few tricks and trends about how color affects users’ attitudes and behavior.

In this article, we’ll cover basic color theory, psychology, accessibility issues, and impact on conversion rate. We’ll also share some of the findings from a recent 50-person study we ran to find out how men and women perceive color schemes differently and how color can attract attention and make a website memorable.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: A Guide to Color, UX, and Conversion Rates

7 Things Every Designer Needs to Know about Accessibility — Salesforce UX — Medium

Accessibility enables people with disabilities to perceive, understand, navigate, interact with, and contribute to the web. Imagine a world where developers know everything there is to know about accessibility. You design it and they build it… perfectly. In this world, only the design itself can cause people with disabilities to have trouble using a product.

These guidelines will cover the major things you need to know in order for your products to be “design-ready” to meet the minimum of standards in Section 508 and the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0. The rest will be up to development and quality testing.

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Read full article at Source: 7 Things Every Designer Needs to Know about Accessibility — Salesforce UX — Medium

4 tips on typography in UI design – InVision Blog

by Chris Bowleron April 6, 2015

Communication plays a vital role in design. Whether you design websites, mobile apps, or wearable UIs, your creations have to clearly communicate their intent and purpose. And since text does a lot of the heavy lifting in communicating purpose, you need a solid understanding of typography.

Of course, designing a user interface differs from designing an ebook or blog theme. But the principles of type-centric design still apply. After all, on-screen communication happens through words, and type is the UI of language.

As Oliver Reichenstein states in his seminal essay, “Web Design is 95% Typography”:

Optimizing typography is optimizing readability, accessibility, usability(!), overall graphic balance.

In other words: optimizing your typography also optimizes your UI.

Here are 4 ways to do just that—plus 3 beautiful products that make the most of their type.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: 4 tips on typography in UI design – InVision Blog

Measuring Accessibility In The User Experience (UX) And The Searcher Experience

Remember, people locate and discover desirable content via browsing, searching and asking. Findability is just as important as usability and accessibility in the user experience.

In my opinion, website accessibility means creating an online environment in which all users, not only those with disabilities, are able to understand, interact with and easily navigate your website content.

In other words, accessibility does not only apply to people. Accessibility also applies totechnology-based users, such as search engines.

I believe that website content should be written and formatted primarily for human users. However, since people use technology to access content, I also believe that website content should accommodate search engines.

Humans first. Search engines second.

Source: Measuring Accessibility In The User Experience (UX) And The Searcher Experience