Tag Archives: wcag

Accessibility in Office 365—enabling greater digital inclusion – Office Blogs

The 2016 International Day of Persons with Disabilities (IDPD), focuses on laying the foundation for a future of greater inclusion for persons with disabilities. In honor of IDPD, we invite all Office 365 customers to lay the foundation for a more inclusive digital environment by discovering and using accessibility capabilities built into Office 365.

Create accessible content with Office 365

Office 365 empowers you to communicate information to your colleagues and customers in a variety of ways: documents, presentations, spreadsheets, emails, chats, sways, notes, videos and more. As you communicate, it is important to meet the diverse needs of your audience. Making your content accessible ensures it can be used without barriers by people with varying levels of vision, hearing, cognition and mobility.

Q. How can I get help with accessibility issues?A. Visit the Office Accessibility Center to find support articles on creating accessible content with Office 365 applications on various platforms or on using Office 365 applications with specific assistive technologies. If you require further assistance, reach out to an accessibility specialist via the Enterprise Disability Answer Desk or Consumer Disability Answer Desk.

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WCAG is not scary anymore – A progressive approach to Website Accessibility | Herin Hentry

WCAG is not scary anymore was the title of my presentation at A11yCamp, Melbourne 2016 representing Planit Software Testing, Accessibility Services which received good feedback from the audience. I thought I will follow that up with an article on LinkedIn to share with a larger audience.

Source: WCAG is not scary anymore – A progressive approach to Website Accessibility | Herin Hentry | Pulse | LinkedIn

Authoring Tool Accessibility Guidelines (ATAG) 2.0 is a W3C Recommendation from Jeanne Spellman on 2015-09-24

ATAG 2.0 helps improve web accessibility by providing guidelines for designing web content authoring tools that are both more accessible to authors with disabilities (Part A) and designed to enable, support, and promote the production of more accessible web content by all authors (Part B). ATAG 2.0 helps authors meet WCAG 2.0.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Authoring Tool Accessibility Guidelines (ATAG) 2.0 is a W3C Recommendation from Jeanne Spellman on 2015-09-24 (w3c-wai-ig@w3.org from July to September 2015)

Accessibility for E-Learning: Section 508 and WCAG

E-learning is a type of web-based content, and therefore, the technical standards outlined in the WCAG and Section 508 §1194.22 apply, if you want or need to make your e-learning courses accessible to those with disabilities. If you’re creating e-learning content for a U.S. government entity, your e-learning content likely needs to be 508-compliant. Several state government entities also require 508-compliance. Also, if you’re not creating e-learning courses directly for a government agency, but you provide services to or are funded by the government, it’s likely that some form of 508-compliance also applies to you.

Similar laws exist in other countries for their government entities, but most other countries have chosen to adopt WCAG as a legal requirement, rather than drafting their own rules. So if you’re creating e-learning content for government entities in other countries, there’s a chance that some level of the WCAG applies to you.

Even if you aren’t required by law to meet the guidelines, isn’t making your e-learning courses more accessible to people with disabilities the right thing to do? You may immediately think “Yes,” however, that the extra cost, effort, and sometimes compromised experience keep many non-government organizations from making accessibility a priority. Instead, they will often choose to use “reasonable accommodation” and provide training in another way, such as having someone sit down with the person and go through the training together.

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Source: Accessibility for E-Learning: Section 508 and WCAG

Is it time to make web accessibility more, well, accessible? | CharityComms

When you work in the business of creating something, be it selling a brand or promoting a cause, you want it to be seen by as many people as possible. The more barriers you put in front of a prospective audience, the lower the potential impact.

This, essentially, is the principle behind online accessibility – eliminating the barriers an audience faces. After all, almost one in five people in the UK has a disability.

Websites designed with accessibly in mind ensure that mentally or physically impaired users can reach and consume the content in two ways: unassisted and assisted.

An analogy I like to use is – if the web were a house, the former is the staircase (your basic browser, essentially) and the latter a lift (the use of assistive technologies such as screen readers).Working, as my agency does, with a host of clients in the pro-social sector, these principles are of particular relevance and are why we spend a lot of time considering the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG)… as should anyone who uses digital to convey their message.

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Read full article at Source: Is it time to make web accessibility more, well, accessible? | CharityComms

Notes on Using ARIA in HTML

This document is a practical guide for developers on how to add accessibility information to HTML elements using the Accessible Rich Internet Applications specification [WAI-ARIA-1.1], which defines a way to make Web content and Web applications more accessible to people with disabilities. This document demonstrates how to use WAI-ARIA in [HTML51], which especially helps with dynamic content and advanced user interface controls developed with Ajax, HTML, JavaScript, and related technologies.

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Read full article at Source: Notes on Using ARIA in HTML

Web Accessibility for Designers | August

Web accessibility makes it easier for people to use the web. It creates a better user experience for a wider audience. It’s not just targeted towards people with disabilities.

“Web accessibility means that people can use the web. Not ‘people with disabilities’. Not ‘blind people and deaf people’. Not ‘people who have cognitive disabilities’ or ‘men who are colour blind’. People who are using the web. People who are using what you’re building.”

(Curated by Lifekludger)
Source: Web Accessibility for Designers | August