Tag Archives: web accessibility

Sounding out the web: accessibility for deaf and hard of hearing people [Part 2]

[Part 2]

In my previous post, I spoke with Ruth MacMullen, an academic librarian and copyright specialist from York, about her experience of being deaf and how it affects how she uses the web. In this next post in the series, Ruth shares some of the things that make life easier for her on the web, and we offer some practical tips on how you can improve accessibility for deaf and hard of hearing people.

Provide subtitles/captions

The YouTube video player showing a video about York St John University with closed captions switched on. The captions are displayed over two lines with the end of the sentence cut off.“Subtitles, that’s the really obvious one”, remarks Ruth as we discuss the things that help her the most. In my previous post, she described the frustration of viewing a video posted on Facebook that lacked subtitles.

Subtitles or captions are the words shown at the bottom of videos that explain what’s being said or what’s happening. The term “subtitles” typically refers only to spoken content, whereas “captions” also includes descriptions of non-speech sounds, such as music, applause and laughter. Outside of North America, the terms are often used interchangeably. So when Ruth refers to subtitles on videos, that’s what she’s talking about.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Sounding out the web: accessibility for deaf and hard of hearing people [Part 2] | The Paciello Group – Your Accessibility Partner (WCAG 2.0/508 audits, VPAT, usability and accessible user experience)

10 guidelines to improve your web accessibility

We put together a list of ten web accessibility guidelines that will guarantee access to your site to any person, in spite of their disabilities.

There’s a quote by Tim Berners-Lee, Director of W3C and inventor of the World Wide Web, that says, “The power of the web is in its universality”. As people who make a living by making websites, it’s our responsibility to ensure everyone has access to them. Web accessibility seems like a tall order on paper, but it’s definitely much easier than it sounds.

Our ten web accessibility guidelines are designed to ensure that all websites are universal.

This will not only help screen reader users, but will also improve browsing experience for slow connections. We’ve sorted our guidelines by implementation time to give you a clear picture of just how much effort you’ll have to put into this process. Before you get overwhelmed, take our word for it—it’s totally worth it.

First things first:

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: 10 guidelines to improve your web accessibility | Aerolab

Developers: get started with web accessibility

If web accessibility is new to you, the path ahead can seem overwhelming.

If web accessibility is new to you, the path ahead can seem overwhelming.

It’s not so bad. I promise!

You could chase perfection forever by building accessible products for every user imaginable. That’s no different from design and development more generally: there’s always room for improvement.

But when it comes to usability — and that includes accessibility — a product doesn’t need to be perfect to be practical. Even small changes can make a big difference.

So here are some tips for how to get started. This guide is written for front-end web developers who are new to accessibility, and it’s by no means comprehensive — but I hope it will help you start a longer journey of learning.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Developers: get started with web accessibility – Medium

Renewed push for improved web accessibility policy in the United States | Access iQ

Two separate calls for improved web accessibility of government websites in the United States are gaining momentum.

Campaigning to improve web accessibility in the United States has increased, with a recently published petition quickly gaining popularity, while politicians have requested that a review of government policy be completed so that further action can be taken.

Petition on White House website

A petition has been listed on the White House Petitions website calling for President Obama to take action on web accessibility policy, citing recent developments which indicate that regulations for non-government websites will not be released until 2018.“People with disabilities struggle to do everyday tasks such as banking, purchasing goods, and more,” the petition says.

The petition has been signed 1,100 times in its first two days of being published. In order to receive a formal response from the White House, it must be signed 100,000 times by Thursday 11 February.

Signed letter from US senators

Nine US senators have contacted the Office of Management and Budget to complete a review of an Advance Notice of Proposed Rule Making (ANPRM), in order to clarify whether websites and other forms of technology are included under titles in the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Renewed push for improved web accessibility policy in the United States | Access iQ