Tag Archives: web

The Writer’s Guide to Making Accessible Web Content

Left-handed people are surrounded by items that aren’t designed for them. Scissors, golf clubs, desks, video game controllers: it’s a right-hander’s world, and it’s annoying that they don’t take your needs into account.

But imagine moving from annoyed to frustrated, because a product is completely unusable. That’s what it feels like to use the Internet if you have a disability. What acts as a small speed bump for some can feel like a mountain to those with disabilities.

“But what can I do?” you ask. “Accessibility has to be designed and coded.”

True. But it doesn’t stop there. Accessibility is about your image alt text, header design, closed captioning, and other little things that anyone can add to their blog posts, websites, and videos. It’ll make your content more accessible, for everyone—even search engines.

Here’s how you can play a role in making the web a more accessible place, and optimize your content for everyone.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: The Writer’s Guide to Making Accessible Web Content

Accessible website design for users with disabilities lags far behind demand

“The internet is, in essence, broken,” said Todd Bankofier, the CEO of accessibility software company AudioEye. Last week the company announced a partnership with web design firm Dealer Inspire, which makes customer-facing sites for auto retailers, to implement AudioEye’s Ally Toolbar across their entire portfolio.

The move “expands our reach immediately, making it much more efficient to continue our mission to make the most expansive infrastructure in the world accessible to everyone,” Bankofier added.

Even the most well-meaning brand leaders and site designers have too narrow a view of what constitutes disability, he said. It’s not just people who are blind, deaf, or use wheelchairs: people with autism, PTSD, visual impairment, epilepsy, dyslexia or colorblindness all have different needs for digital access. AudioEye’s Ally Toolbar takes all these users into account and allows a person to select precisely the site they need to see.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Accessible website design for users with disabilities lags far behind demand | Campaign US

21 Chrome Extensions for Special Needs

21 Chrome Extensions for Struggling Students and Special Needs

Technology can be a powerful tool to assist students with special needs or any sort of learning challenge. In particular the Chrome web browser allows users to install a wide variety of web extensions that provide tools that can help all learners, regardless of ability level.In this blog post we will take a look at 21 Chrome web extensions that can assist students in five main categories: Text to Speech, Readability, Reading Comprehension, Focus, Navigation

Some of the tools fit into more than one topic, but each is only listed once. Certainly this list does not cover all of the useful web extensions available for struggling learners, but it is a great place to begin. In addition to the list of extension, I have also linked in the video and help guide from a webinar I did a while back on “Google Tools for Special Needs”.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Control Alt Achieve: 21 Chrome Extensions for Struggling Students and Special Needs

Easy Checks – A First Review of Web Accessibility | (WAI) | W3C

Easy Checks – A First Review of Web Accessibility

This page helps you start to assess the accessibility of a web page. With these simple steps, you can get an idea whether or not accessibility is addressed in even the most basic way.

These checks cover just a few accessibility issues and are designed to be quick and easy, rather than definitive. A web page could seem to pass these checks, yet still have significant accessibility barriers. More robust assessment is needed to evaluate accessibility comprehensively.

This page provides checks for the following specific aspects of a web page. It also provides guidance on Next Steps and links to more evaluation resources.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Easy Checks – A First Review of Web Accessibility | Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI) | W3C

Using Keyboard-only Navigation, for Web Accessibility

Blind and low-vision users, as well as those with mobility disabilities, rely on their keyboards — not a mouse — to navigate websites. Online forms are keyboard "traps" when they don't allow a user to tab through it without completing a field. That is not the case with Newegg's checkout form, which properly allows users to tab through it, and ultimately return to the browser bar, without completing a field.

… Programmers are big fans of using the keyboard instead of continually shifting between the keyboard and mouse.

And yet a significant percentage of websites make it difficult or even impossible for users to perform some activities without using a mouse or other pointer device. This curious relationship between using the keyboard and developing for the keyboard has always seemed imbalanced to me.

To be fair, navigating the Internet with a keyboard is very different from using a keyboard shortcut to perform a complex task.

The keyboard shortcuts that people use with most desktop software are combinations of two to four keys that directly activate menu actions buried somewhere in the program’s options.

Navigating a website with the keyboard primarily requires only a few keys, but they’re used constantly. The following keys are most fundamental to using a website.

  • TAB
  • SHIFT+TAB
  • SPACE
  • ENTER
  • The left, right, up, and down arrow keys.

In complex web applications, like Google Docs, more complex keyboard shortcuts are common. But for an average ecommerce site — where the priorities are getting the user to find a page, learn about a product, and then go through the purchase process — those keys are usually all you need. These are the keys that are natively defined by browsers for the operation of web pages.

Why Navigate with Just a Keyboard?

 

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source

Four Free Tools for Automated Accessibility Testing of Web Apps

Designing and developing for web accessibility has become a requirement of modern computing. Depending on the content and complexity of your project requirements, it can also be a very difficult pursuit. Two colleagues of mine have already written excellent articles exploring the need for and design of accessible web sites: Designing Accessible Software – Breaking Down WCAG 2.0 and Easy Design & Front-End Practices for Improving Accessibility. According to the experts at Deque Systems, somewhere between 20%….

…….

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Four Free Tools for Automated Accessibility Testing of Web Apps

Slides: London Web Standards; Making SVG accessible

London Web Standards is an established and popular meetup for web professionals. The meetups cover a broad range of topics including design, development, UX and accessibility, and this month I had the opportunity to talk about SVG accessibility. The talk looked at SVG past, present, and future, and explored the benefits and challenges it brings in terms of accessibility. Topics included the best way to maximise SVG accessibility, how to use ARIA to supplement the native accessibility of SVG, and how to us

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Slides: London Web Standards; Making SVG accessible | The Paciello Group – Your Accessibility Partner (WCAG 2.0/508 audits, VPAT, usability and accessible user experience)

The web is awesome and everyone should be able to read it.

These last months I’ve been improving my website accessibility so anyone can understand it. Here’s what I’ve learned:
By anyone I mean any person that doesn’t use the internet like I do. Having empathy with the users is one of the things I’ve been learning on web development. You should give it a try as well. Not everyone interacts with an interface or uses the same device and input devices as you do.
Empathy is the capacity to understand or feel what another person is experiencing from within the other person’s frame of reference, i.e., the capacity to place oneself in another’s position. — wikipedia
So you should adapt your product for them. By adapting I don’t mean making it uglier. I mean making it simple. And doing something simple is hard. It’s good to force yourself to rethink your interface or logic in order to accomplish a more complete and intuitive solution.

That old lady being awesome on the web
The problem
I love to explore new interactive ways to communicate a message, so last Summer I rethought my personal website. I don’t consider it a straightforward portfolio, as interaction is the way to explore it. That’s the best part about it and at the same time the worst part.
Some months ago I got to know that users who use only keyboard or screen readers can’t understand shit. They have so many visual and interactive elements to explore that they end up lost. As a web lover, excluding people from using it to its fullest potential, just makes me really sad.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: The web is awesome and everyone should be able to read it.

Prototyping accessibility in web and mobile UI design

Adaptable, interactive and coherent prototypes for users with disabilities. Covering accessibility in the prototyping phase of web and app design.

Pay close attention to color, contrast and visual hierarchy

Make your interactive UI elements more interactive

Don’t crowd me!

Make your app accessible by being adaptable

“Flexibility is the key to ensuring that your website is accessible to everyone.” Shaun Anderson, Hobo Web

Prototyping responsive design is actually pretty easy. With Justinmind prototyping tool, it really only involves creating a set of screens of different sizes (to represent the different screens sizes that your users use), adding the content to each screen, and adding linking events between the screens. In fact, we’ve created a nifty tutorial in our Support section to teach you step by step.

Don’t forget the user testing

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Prototyping accessibility in web and mobile UI design