Tag Archives: windows

Windows 10 upgrade for assistive technology users

For the general public, the free upgrade offer to Windows 10 ends on 29 July. However, if you use assistive technologies, you can still get the free upgrade offer even after the general public deadline expires, as Microsoft continues our efforts to improve the Windows 10 experience for people who use these technologies.

With the Windows 10 Anniversary Update, we’ve taken a number of steps to improve the accessibility of Windows 10 accessibility. To learn more, read our blog that details some of these improve

Curated by (Lifekludger)
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Blind Arduino Blog: Arduino Setup and Accessibility Tips for Windows

In a world of talking iPhones, sexy accessibility announcements, and high-quality open-source screen readers, the naive sighted person could be forgiven for assuming that we have finally reached the point where a blind person could simply download and use the same exact software tools as everyone else for any given problem.

Blind people know that it is rarely that simple. There are a wide variety of issues that still stand as barriers to equal access in all sorts of situations, and Arduino development on Windows is no exception.

While it is definitely possible to set up an accessible development environment for Arduino on Windows, many of the steps may not be immediately obvious, especially to the beginner.

This post is intended to streamline the Arduino setup process, flagging accessibility work-arounds, and providing a step-by-step guide to setting up the tools you’ll need for Arduino development as a blind maker.

If you are just getting started and don’t know anything about Windows, software development, accessibility, or Arduino, this blog is probably not the best place to start. This article assumes you’re already comfortable with Windows and your screen reader, and that you know what Arduino is and have some motivation to make things with it.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Blind Arduino Blog: Arduino Setup and Accessibility Tips for Windows

The Accessibility Guide for Windows 10 and Office 2016 – helping students with special needs – Education – Site Home – MSDN Blogs

A Microsoft focused Education ICT blog from Australia covering K-12 ICT, TAFE ICT and University ICT, on subjects such as LMS and VLE systems, education CRM systems for student recruitment and student retention, cloud-based education and learning analytics and assessment.

Source: The Accessibility Guide for Windows 10 and Office 2016 – helping students with special needs – Education – Site Home – MSDN Blogs

Accessibility: Towards a more inclusive web with Microsoft Edge and Windows 10

Windows has used the Microsoft Active Accessibility (MSAA) API since Windows 98 to express buttons, menus, text, and other on-screen content to assistive technology. Assistive technology vendors have used the MSAA API (along with other app-specific APIs like the DOM in IE, the Office Object Model in Office, and even scraping video drivers) to make text and interfaces more accessible. These techniques have the disadvantage of varying wildly between different applications and documents, which leads to a fragmented and unreliable experience. As user interfaces, documents, and the web significantly increased in complexity, Microsoft introduced the more modern UI Automation (UIA) API in Windows Vista as the successor to MSAA.

UIA was designed to expose more information about the user interface and structured documents, improve performance, and be portable across platforms. Because UIA replaces a variety of potentially unreliable and non-interoperable techniques with a single API, it reduces software complexity, allows developers to express novel UI concepts more easily, and improves stability and user experience consistency between web and native apps, across all types of assistive technology.

In Microsoft Edge, we are thrilled to finally have the opportunity to make the transition from MSAA to UIA, alongside enormous complementary investments in rearchitecting our DOM implementation and rewriting the browser interface from scratch. The change to UIA is our largest investment in browser accessibility ever, and it lays the foundation for a more inclusive web experience for users who depend on assistive technology in Windows 10. Because EdgeHTML is used throughout Windows 10 (inside Universal Windows Apps, in Cortana, etc.), these benefits will have an impact beyond the browser. Users will also benefit from the evergreen nature of the EdgeHTML engine.

curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Accessibility: Towards a more inclusive web with Microsoft Edge and Windows 10

How Windows Screen Readers Work on the Web – SSB BART Group

If you try to use a Windows screen reader on the web for the first time, you might find the experience to be daunting and confusing. This is because Windows screen readers introduce new access paradigms which do not always match what is displayed visually. Windows screen readers offer several modes to allow a user to review and interact with web content. Successfully using a screen reader on the web requires the user to be able to determine which mode is currently active, the operation paradigm for each mode, and how to switch modes as required. Developers also need to be cognizant of the screen reader modes used for accessing different types of content and the effect that their code will have on the user experience if a particular mode is used.

Curated by (Lifekludger)

Read full article at Source: How Windows Screen Readers Work on the Web – SSB BART Group